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Australian & New Zealand Military Aircraft Serials & History

RAN & RAAF A10 Fairey IIID

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De Havilland D.H.50A 
A8-1 
Point Cook 1923
Photo via Ken Rowland

     
 

Fairey IIID Image Gallery

 
     
 

On 7th April 1921 the Assistant Minister for Defence announced the Government’s intention to purchase 12 Fairey IIID seaplanes for the Royal Australian Navy from the Fairey Aviation Co Ltd UK for the sum of approximately 45,000 pounds. However, unforeseen financial constraints meant the actual order placed with Fairey was for only six machines, with additional engines, spares and specialist tools with a contract value of 23,000 pounds ($1.73M today). The six machines with Serials ANA-1 thru ANA-6 (Australian Naval Aircraft) were manufactured at the Fairey Aviation Works, Hamble in Southampton during the period May-September 1921. After formation of the RAAF on 31 March 1921 the six aircraft were transferred from the RAN to the RAAF.

 

The first aircraft wearing the serial ANA-1 (named Mary) was accepted into RAAF service at Hamble by Mrs. Mary Hughes, wife of Australia’s Prime minister on 12th August 1921. The last aircraft was delivered in early September and all six were then prepared for delivery to Australia and departed from the UK in late September, arriving in Australia in early November. Because of the parlous state of the economy at that time and the scarcity of qualified RAAF personnel only one aircraft was originally reassembled and used for training and the remaining five were placed in storage. Three were removed from storage sometime during the next two years and the remaining two about mid-1923. The type was largely unknown to the Australian public because of the limited amount of flying time in that era and, the fleet cooperation and survey work they performed kept them out of the public limelight. The main reason people recalled the Fairey IIID at all was the circumnavigation flight of Australia carried out in 1924 which drew worldwide praise and acclaim as a daring feat of airmanship.

 

The Fairey IIID in service was popular with aircrew but they were difficult to maintain and when used in tropical and sub-tropical areas their performance was significantly degraded. Nonetheless they did fill a useful niche and set a high standard for the subsequent replacement seaplane types that were to follow. The six aircraft did not enjoy a long career: with two aircraft no longer in service by the end of 1924; the third by the end of 1925; and, the remaining three almost unusable by late-1927 and finally converted to scrap by early 1929.  Like nearly all of Australia’s early defence force aircraft no physical airframes remain and virtually nothing else of the Fairey IIID to show what our early aviators used used during the RAAF’s formative years

 
     
 
RAN Serial RAAF Serial c/n Aircraft History
ANA-1 A10-1 F.394

1921          Ordered for the Royal Australian Navy as Australian Naval Aircraft 1 [ANA-1].

1921          Built by Fairey Aviation Co Ltd at a cost of 3,000 pounds in their Aviation Works at Hamble, Southampton UK to Air Ministry Specification 38/22.

12Aug21     Christened ‘Mary’ by Mrs. Mary Hughes, wife of Australia’s Prime Minister, at Hamble. The Australian Air Board introduced the A numbering system for RAAF aircraft and ANA-1 became A10-1.

21Sep21     Aircraft was disassembled, crated and loaded onto the 5,936 ton Australian Commonwealth Line steamer SS Boonah and shipped to Australia.

04Nov21     Arrived at No 1 Victoria Dock, Port Melbourne VIC.

06Nov21     Transported to RAAF Base Point Cook for unpacking, assembly and testing. After assembly the aircraft was 1st flown by O8 FLTLT Hippolyte Ferdinand De La Rue who was OIC Seaplane Flight at Point Cook.

20Dec21     Allocated to No 5 Naval Cooperation Squadron.

06Apr22    Allocation to 5 Sqn cancelled. Reallocated to the newly formed F Flight (better known as Seaplane Flight) at No 1 Flying Training School.

1922-23     For these two years the aircraft mainly languished at Point Cook as there were severe financial constraints on operating the aircraft, or providing the necessary pilots and ground crew. What little flying occurred was mainly limited to training and the fleet cooperation role. Occasionally, a newsworthy mission was permitted that reflected favourably on the government of the day.

1922          Conducted a trial aerial survey in with LTCDR C.W. Stevens’ survey of Western Port, Victoria.

May23       Used for training Navigators in the new three month Naval Cooperation Observers course.

Nov23       Conducted a reconnaissance of possible landing sites along the east coast between Melbourne and Sydney. Pilot FLTLT Ivor Edward McIntyre CBE, AFC and observer WGCDR Stanley James Goble CBE DSO DFC.

17Mar24    Piloted by FLGOFF J.B. McIntyre, and accompanied by A10-2, led a RAAF Formation of 22 aircraft to meet the Royal Navy Special Service Squadron in Port Phillip Bay on its 1923-24 world cruise. The Squadron consisted of the Battlecruisers HMS Hood & Repulse and the Cruisers HMS Danae, Dauntless, Delhi, Dragon & HMAS Adelaide.

18Aug24     As the aircraft was about to become airborne the machine suddenly capsized and began to sink. The pilot FLTLT Summers and an unknown observer managed to free themselves from the sinking plane and started to swim for the beach, they were picked up by a local motor boat and taken back to the Base. 

Aug24        The aircraft sank in about 17ft of water and was subsequently salvaged but was damaged beyond repair. Aircraft was stripped of any usable parts and the residue scrapped.

1963          The bronze Fairey number plate, F394, was presented to the RAAF Museum by an anonymous donor.
 

ANA-2 A10-2 F.395

1921          Ordered for the Royal Australian Navy as Australian Naval Aircraft 2 [ANA-2].

1921          Built by Fairey Aviation Co Ltd at a cost of 3,000 pounds in their Aviation Works at Hamble, Southampton UK to Air Ministry Specification 38/22.

31Mar21     RAAF formed and took responsibility for all Australian military aircraft.

12Aug21     Handed over to Australian officials at Hamble. The new Australian Air Board introduced the A numbering system for RAAF aircraft and ANA-2 thus became A10-2.

21Sep21     Aircraft was disassembled, crated and loaded onto the 5,936 ton Australian Commonwealth Line steamer SS Boonah and shipped to Australia.

04Nov21     Arrived at No 1 Victoria Dock, Port Melbourne VIC.

06Nov21     Transported to RAAF Base Point Cook and placed in storage pending the formation of No 5 Squadron in the Sydney area.

20Dec21     Allocated to No 5 Naval Cooperation Squadron.

06Apr22    Allocation to 5 Sqn cancelled. Reallocated to the newly formed F Flight (better known as Seaplane Flight) at No 1 Flying Training School.

1922-23     Removed from storage and assembled at some time during this period. The aircraft then mainly languished at Point Cook as there were severe financial constraints on operating the aircraft, or providing the necessary pilots and ground crew. What little flying occurred was mainly limited to training and the fleet cooperation role. Occasionally, a mission was permitted that reflected favourably on the government of the day.

Apr23        Attached to RAN Fleet Support Unit in Sydney Harbour for photography experiments in conjunction with the planned Barrier Reef Survey work.

May23       Used for training Navigators in the new three month Naval Cooperation Observers course.

02Feb24    Made the 1st crossing of Bass Strait in a seaplane following an 8-hour flight from Melbourne to Hobart, with a refueling stop at St Helens. Conducted a survey for seaplane landing sites between Melbourne and Hobart; Pilot FLTLT Ivor Edward McIntyre CBE, AFC; observer WGCDR Stanley James Goble CBE DSO DFC; and, aero fitter CPL Gottschaff. Also took part in the 1924 Hobart Regatta in support of HMA Fleet elements. Returned to Point Cook via Launceston on 12Feb23.

17Mar24    Piloted by FLGOFF Ernest Mustard, and accompanied by A10-1, led a RAAF Formation of 22 aircraft to meet the Royal Navy Special Service Squadron in Port Phillip Bay on its 1923-24 world cruise. The Squadron consisted of the Battlecruisers HMS Hood & Repulse and the Cruisers HMS Danae, Dauntless, Delhi, Dragon & HMAS Adelaide.

21Jun24     Attached to RAN Fleet Support in Sydney for trials with the 1,250 ton Arabis class survey ship HMAS Geranium in conjunction with the planned Barrier Reef Survey work.

01Aug24     Ferried from Point Cook to Townsville by FLTLT Ivor Ernest McIntyre CBE, AFC and CPL Gottschaff to join HMAS Geranium for Stage 1 of the 1924-25 Great Barrier Reef survey. Arrived in Townsville at 1430hrs on 03Aug.

Aug-Dec24 Crew of O5 FLGOFF Thomas Anthony Swinbourne supported by three photographers, two riggers, two aero fitters, a coxswain and a storeman spent the next five months in partnership with Geranium surveying 19 reefs with a total area of over 2,000 sq km. The named features Mustard Patches, Swinbourne Patches and Raaf Shoals still appear on maps to this day.

Dec24        Aircraft underwent a major servicing and placed into storage at Townsville until required for Stage II of the survey.

15May25    Removed from storage and prepared for flight to Point Cook for modifications before the next survey task. Planned ferry route was via Bowen-Bundaberg-Southport-Port Macquarie-Sydney-Eden-Point Cook.

18May25    Departed Townsville and reached Southport. Departed Southport on 19May and made a forced landing at Forster NSW after engine problems. Remained at Forster for two days and finally departed for Point Cook on 22May after two abortive attempts. Returned to Point Cook on 25May.

Jun-Nov25 Disassembled and transported by steamer to Townsville where it was reassembled and used to support HMS Geranium for the next five months of the Stage II 1924-25 Great Barrier Reef survey. Crew of O5 FLGOFF Thomas Anthony Swinbourne supported by two photographers, three riggers, two aero fitters, a coxswain and a storeman.

Nov25        Returned to Point Cook.

18Dec25     Crashed and damaged beyond repair, written off and scrapped.
 

ANA-3 A10-3 F.396

1921          Ordered for the Royal Australian Navy as Australian Naval Aircraft 3 [ANA-3].

1921          Built by Fairey Aviation Co Ltd at a cost of 3,000 pounds in their Aviation Works at Hamble, Southampton UK to Air Ministry Specification 38/22.

31Mar21     RAAF formed and took responsibility for all Australian military aircraft.

12Aug21     Handed over to Australian officials at Hamble. The new Australian Air Board introduced the A numbering system for RAAF aircraft and ANA-3 thus became A10-3.

21Sep21     Aircraft was disassembled, crated and loaded onto the 5,936 ton Australian Commonwealth Line steamer SS Boonah and shipped to Australia.

04Nov21     Arrived at No 1 Victoria Dock, Port Melbourne VIC.

06Nov21     Transported to RAAF Base Point Cook and placed in storage pending the formation of No 5 Squadron in the Sydney area.

20Dec21     Allocated to No 5 Naval Cooperation Squadron.

02Apr22    Aircraft uncrated and assembly begun.

06Apr22    Allocation to 5 Sqn cancelled. Reallocated to the newly formed F Flight (better known as Seaplane Flight) at No 1 Flying Training School.

19Apr22     1st test flight following assembly and acceptance checks. Interestingly the aircraft still wore the Serial ANA-3.

1922-23     The aircraft mainly languished at Point Cook as there were severe financial constraints on operating the aircraft, or providing the necessary pilots and ground crew. What little flying occurred was mainly limited to training and the fleet cooperation role. Occasionally, a newsworthy mission was permitted that reflected favourably on the government of the day.

01Apr24    The Chief of Air Staff WGCDR Stanley James Goble (later AVM S.J. Goble CBE DSO DFC) announced that he would lead an attempt to circumnavigate Australia in a Fairey IIID aircraft. Before the flight began extensive preparations were made including: prepositioning of fuel at no less than 37 locations; four-man ground parties prepositioned at Thursday Island and Perth with spare parts, engines and consumables.

ANA-3 (A10-3) was selected as the aircraft and was modified with an additional 40 gal fuel tank, an extra radiator, extra cooling vents on the engine cowling and many other ‘tweaks’.  To compensate for the additional weight the Scarf gun mounting, bomb carrier gear and WT equipment were removed. The aircraft was sprayed with protective coats of lacquer and varnish, gloss white marine paint and Black trim. RAAF Serial A10-3 applied.

06Apr24    Departed Point Cook at 0630hrs for the circumnavigation, crew of O2 WGCDR Stanley James Goble CBE DSO DFC and FLTLT Ivor Edward McIntyre CBE AFC. Planned route was up Qld coast to Thursday Island, across the Gulf of Carpentaria to Darwin, then across to WA down to Perth, across WA/SA to Adelaide then back to Pt Cook.

19May24    Arrived back at Point Cook after successful circumnavigation taking 44 days and covering 13,800km spread over 90 flying hours and stops at 24 towns and cities around Australia. Both men were awarded the Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) and the 1924 Royal Aero Club’s Britannia Challenge Trophy for ‘the most meritorious performance in the air’, and the contemporary press classed the flight "the finest in the history of aviation".

10Jun24     Flew to Sydney via Eden NSW and loaded onto 1,250 ton Arabis class survey ship HMAS Geranium. Departed next day to conduct a brief photographic reconnaissance of the southern portion of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR). Crew was FLTLT Ivor Edward McIntyre CBE AFC and LAC Gottschalk. At the completion of the GBR Photographic Survey the aircraft returned to Point Cook and HMAS Geranium proceeded to Townsville.

01Sep24     Withdrawn from use and donated to the Australian War Museum (AWM), Melbourne for preservation and display as a significant national relic.

1925          Moved to the AWM building in Sydney and placed on display.

20Nov28    The AWM Board of Trustees decided the aircraft did not meet the criteria for storage and display in the AWM as the aircraft had not served during the war.  The aircraft was then dismantled and stored in the Air Force Drill Hall, Victoria Barracks, Sydney.

1930          From 1928 to 1930 the aircraft was offered to various institutions but the offers were never accepted. The last know history of the aircraft has it on charge with No 3 (F) Sqn at RAAF Base Richmond but physically located at Victoria Barracks.

2015          No trace of the aircraft remains.

Fairey IIID 
ANA 3 ( A10-3 ) 
taxying Point Cook April 1922. 
via Rod Farquhar. Fairey IIID 
ANA 3 ( A10-3 ) 
Point Cook April 1922. 
via Rod Farquhar.

ANA-4 A10-4 F.397

1921          Ordered for the Royal Australian Navy as Australian Naval Aircraft 4 [ANA-4].

1921          Built by Fairey Aviation Co Ltd at a cost of 3,000 pounds in their Aviation Works at Hamble, Southampton UK to Air Ministry Specification 38/22.

31Mar21     RAAF formed and took responsibility for all Australian military aircraft.

12Aug21     Handed over to Australian officials at Hamble. The new Australian Air Board introduced the A numbering system for RAAF aircraft and ANA-4 thus became A10-4.

21Sep21     Aircraft was disassembled, crated and loaded onto the 5,936 ton Australian Commonwealth Line steamer SS Boonah and shipped to Australia.

04Nov21     Arrived at No 1 Victoria Dock, Port Melbourne VIC.

09Nov21     Transported to RAAF Base Point Cook and placed in storage unassembled.

1922-23     Removed from storage and assembled at some time during this period.

Apr23        Allocated to F Flight at No 1 Flying Training School, better known as Seaplane Flight.  Removed from storage, reassembled and test flown.

May23       Used for training Navigators in the new three month Naval Cooperation Observers course.

01Aug24     Ferried from Point Cook to Townsville by coastal steamer to join the 1,250 ton Arabis class survey ship HMAS Geranium for Stage 1 of the 1924-25 Great Barrier Reef survey. Crew of O3 FLTLT Ernest A. Mustard DFC supported by three photographers, two riggers, two aero fitters, a coxswain and a storeman spent the next five months in partnership with Geranium surveying 19 reefs with a total area of over 2,000 sq km. The named features Mustard Patches, Swinbourne Patches and RAAF Shoals still appear on maps today.

Dec24        Aircraft underwent a major servicing and placed into storage at Townsville until required for Stage II of the survey.

15May25    Removed from storage and prepared for flight to Point Cook for modifications before the next survey task. Planned ferry route was via Bowen-Bundaberg-Southport-Port Macquarie-Sydney-Eden-Point Cook.

18May25    Departed Townsville with A10-2 and reached Southport. Departed Southport on 19May and landed at Forster NSW after A10-2 encountered engine problems. Remained at Forster for two days and finally departed for Point Cook on 22May after two abortive attempts. Returned to Point Cook on 25May.

Jun-Nov25 Disassembled and transported by steamer to Townsville where it was reassembled and used to support A10-2 for the next five months of the Stage II 1924-25 Great Barrier Reef survey. Crew of O3 FLTLT Ernest A. Mustard DFC supported by two photographers, three riggers, two aero fitters, a coxswain and a storeman.

Nov25        Returned to Point Cook.

Dec25        Converted from a three-seater to a two-seater initial training seaplane.

1926-29     Served with Seaplane Flight as the ab initio seaplane trainer until superseded by the DH Gipsy Moth seaplanes in 1928.

25May29    Because of the deteriorated state of the aircraft at this time the Australian Defence Committee recommended the airframe be destroyed rather than sold as surplus to the public.

1929          Aircraft stripped of usable equipment and the residue destroyed.
 

ANA-5 A10-5 F.398

1921          Ordered for the Royal Australian Navy as Australian Naval Aircraft 5 [ANA-5].

1921          Built by Fairey Aviation Co Ltd at a cost of 3,000 pounds in their Aviation Works at Hamble, Southampton UK to Air Ministry Specification 38/22.

31Mar21     RAAF formed and took responsibility for all Australian military aircraft.

12Aug21     Handed over to Australian officials at Hamble. The new Australian Air Board introduced the A numbering system for RAAF aircraft and ANA-5 thus became A10-5.

21Sep21     Aircraft was disassembled, crated and loaded onto the 5,936 ton Australian Commonwealth Line steamer SS Boonah and shipped to Australia.

04Nov21     Arrived at No 1 Victoria Dock, Port Melbourne VIC.

09Nov21     Transported to RAAF Base Point Cook and placed in storage unassembled.

1922-23     Held in storage unassembled.

1923          Allocated to F Flight at No 1 Flying Training School, better known as Seaplane Flight.  Removed from storage, reassembled and test flown.

May23       Used for training Navigators in the new three month Naval Cooperation Observers course.

1925-27     Regularly rotated between Point Cook and Eden, NSW to provide Fleet Support to the RAN. A detachment of up to three aircraft was based at Eden for varying durations during this period.

10Jul25      On a routine training flight the aircraft ran out of petrol at 1730hrs and was forced to land in the sea about two miles east of Lorne, VIC.  The aircraft drifted toward Lorne until it stuck fast on rocks near the mouth of the Erskine River. The crew of FLGOFF T.A. Swinbourne and FLGOFF William F. Walms fired distress rockets and local residents responded to their plight. The initial rescue attempts were unsuccessful and the crew were forced to spend the night in the aircraft. The aircraft was pulled off the rocks on the high tide at 0300hrs and beached nearby.

11Jul25      The aircraft was partially disassembled and placed on a Meteor transport vehicle and returned to Point Cook for repair.

23Jul25     Departed from Eden, NSW accompanied by A10-6 to try and locate the 56 ships of the US Pacific Fleet near Gabo Island, Bass Strait. Aircraft became separated in appalling weather but A10-5 crewed by FLTLT Ivor McIntyre CBE, AFC and FLGOFF William F. Walms by good work and good luck located the fleet, much to the chagrin of the Americans who had cancelled all flying because of the weather.

14Oct25  Accompanied by A10-6 conducted a survey of the proposed mail/passenger air route Melbourne-King Island-Launceston. After setting off from Point Cook on 14 October, the two aircraft visited Flinders and other islands to decide on the most suitable locations for emergency landing grounds. Crew of A10-5 FLTLT AE “George” Hempel; Captain Edgar Johnston of Civilian Air Authority.

27Jan26    Accompanied by A10-6 conducted part the 1927 Recruitment Drive to Tasmania. Conducted recruitment drive to Launceston-Hobart-Devonport.  Forced to land on the Tamar River at Beauty Point Launceston to repair a fractured oil pipe on 29Jan. Attended the Hobart Regatta on 4Feb26 and as part of the display carried out simulated torpedo attacks on the visiting Japanese 10,000 ton Izumo class cruiser HIJMS Iwate.  Returned to Point Cook on 7Feb26. Pilot was Lt Jonathan H Ross RAN and passenger SQNLDR R.M Drummond.

1927-29     Served out the remainder of its RAAF career with Seaplane Flight at Point Cook but flying time was very restricted due to a combination of factors including spares availability; aircraft condition; funding; and, manpower shortages. Also, the aircraft was superseded in its primary role by the DH Gipsy Moth seaplanes from early 1928 onwards.

25May29    Because of the deteriorated state of the aircraft at this time the Australian Defence Committee recommended the airframe be destroyed rather than sold as surplus to the public.

1929    Aircraft stripped of usable equipment and the residue destroyed.

Fairey IIID 
A10-5
Photo via Martin Edwards      Fairey IIID
A10-5 
Point Cook
Photo via Ken Rowland

ANA-6 A10-6 F.399

1921          Ordered for the Royal Australian Navy as Australian Naval Aircraft 6 [ANA-6].

1921          Built by Fairey Aviation Co Ltd at a cost of 3,000 pounds in their Aviation Works at Hamble, Southampton UK to Air Ministry Specification 38/22.

31Mar21     RAAF formed and took responsibility for all Australian military aircraft.

12Aug21     Handed over to Australian officials at Hamble. The new Australian Air Board introduced the A numbering system for RAAF aircraft and ANA-6 thus became A10-6.

21Sep21     Aircraft was disassembled, crated and loaded onto the 5,936 ton Australian Commonwealth Line steamer SS Boonah and shipped to Australia.

04Nov21     Arrived at No 1 Victoria Dock, Port Melbourne VIC.

09Nov21     Transported to RAAF Base Point Cook and placed in storage unassembled.

1922-23     Held in storage unassembled.

1923          Allocated to F Flight at No 1 Flying Training School, better known as Seaplane Flight.  Removed from storage, reassembled and test flown.

May23       Used for training Navigators in the new three month Naval Cooperation Observers course.

1925-27     Regularly rotated between Point Cook and Eden, NSW to provide Fleet Support to the RAN. A detachment of up to three aircraft was based at Eden for varying durations during this period.

23Jul25     Departed from Eden, NSW accompanied by A10-5 to try and locate the 56 ships of the US Pacific Fleet near Gabo Island, Bass Strait. Aircraft became separated in appalling weather, A10-6 crewed by FLTLT Arthur Ernest Hempel and SGT Charles Gates could not find the fleet and returned to Eden.

14Oct25  Accompanied by A10-6 conducted a survey of the proposed mail/passenger air route Melbourne-King Island-Launceston. After setting off from Point Cook on 14 October, the two aircraft visited Flinders and other islands to decide on the most suitable locations for emergency landing grounds. Crew was FLTLT Ivor E McIntyre CBE, AFC and LAC Miles. Returned to Point Cook on 25Oct25.

27Jan26    Accompanied by A10-5 conducted part the 1927 Annual Recruitment Drive to Tasmania visiting Launceston-Hobart-Devonport. Attended the Hobart Regatta on 4Feb26 and as part of the display carried out simulated torpedo attacks on the visiting Japanese 10,000 ton Izumo class cruiser HIJMS Iwate. Pilot was FLTLT Ivor E McIntyre CBE, AFC and passenger SQNLDR A.T Cole.  Returned to Point Cook on 7Feb26.

1926-28     Served out the remainder of its RAAF career with Seaplane Flight at Point Cook but flying time was very restricted due to a combination of factors including spares availability; aircraft condition; funding; and, manpower shortages. Also, the aircraft was superseded in its primary role by the DH Gipsy Moth seaplanes from early 1928 onwards.

16Jun28     Declared uneconomical for further repairs, withdrawn from service and converted to components. Residue destroyed by fire.

Fairey IIID
A10-6
Photo via Ken Rowland

 
     
 

Fairey IIID 
Point Cook Jetty
Photo via Ken Rowland Fairey IID 
Photo via Ken Rowland Fairey IIID
Photo Eric Douglas Fairey IIID with Rolls Royce Eagle VIII engine. 
Photo Eric Douglas (on Left) 
c1920-22

 
     

The Authors of this page are Paul McGuiness, Darren Crick and Brendan Cowan

Sources: Australian War Memorial Website, The Fairey IIID in Australia by GRPCPT Keith Isaacs, National Archives, RAAF E/E 88 Cards, RAAF Unit History Files, National Library AUS, The Third Brother by C.D. Coulthard-Clark, UK Serials Website.

Emails: Robert Geale, Dave Fagan, Stig Jarlevik, Daniel Leahy, Gordon Birkett

Version 1.2 03 June 2015

     

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